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Amanda Rogers

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Identity, performance and globalisation are at the heart of the cultural practices interrogated by Amanda Rogers in Performing Asian Transnationalisms: Theatre, Identity and the Geography of Performance (Routledge, 2015). The book explores the global networks of theatre that have emerged between Asia, America and Europe, using a variety of policy, practice and political examples. The book argues that globalisation, and the attendant transnational flows of people and culture, has both the potential to create theatre careers and new, important, works, whist at the same time constraining individuals, communities and cultural forms. The book draws on a rich combination of ethnographic and interview data, along with theoretically informed cultural analysis, using examples ranging from The British Council and the Singapore Art Festival, through Asian American and British East Asian identities, to controversial performances of the Orphan of Zhao. The book will be of primary interest to cultural, geography and performance scholars, but has valuable insights for social science and the humanities more generally.

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Elizabeth Maddock DillonNew World Drama: The Performative Commons in the Atlantic World, 1649-1849

March 23, 2015

Riots, audiences on stage, fabulous costumes, gripping stories. That's what theater was like in the Atlantic world in the age of slavery and colonialism. Elizabeth Maddock Dillon wonderful book New World Drama: The Performative Commons in the Atlantic World, 1649-1849 (Duke University Press, 2014) vividly invokes a transatlantic network of performances and their publics, and argues […]

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Jen HarvieFair Play: Art, Performance and Neoliberalism

February 9, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] Arts and culture are under threat in the age of austerity. This threat is underpinned by the misuse of the idea of participation in contemporary performance. This is one of the central arguments of Fair Play: Art, Performance and Neoliberalism (Palgrave, 2013) by Professor Jen Harvie. The book considers how arts and culture […]

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R. Keller KimbroughWondrous Brutal Fictions: Eight Buddhist Tales from the Early Japanese Puppet Theater

January 23, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Buddhist Studies] In his recent book, Wondrous Brutal Fictions: Eight Buddhist Tales from the Early Japanese Puppet Theater (Columbia University Press, 2013), R. Keller Kimbrough provides us with eight beautifully translated sekkyō 説経 and ko-jōruri 古浄瑠璃 (“old” Japanese puppet theatre) pieces from the seventeenth century.  Sekkyō was a type of publically-performed Buddhist storytelling that focused on the forces of karma and the […]

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Steven FieldingA State of Play: British Politics on Screen, Stage and Page, from Anthony Trollope to The Thick of It

December 12, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] To understand contemporary politics we must understand how it is represented in fiction. This is the main argument in A State of Play: British Politics on Screen, Stage and Page, from Anthony Trollope to The Thick of It (Bloomsbury Academic, 2014) a new book by Steven Fielding, Professor of Politics at the University of Nottingham. […]

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Peter FilichiaBroadway Musicals: The Biggest Hit and the Biggest Flop of the Season 1959-2009

May 27, 2011

Speaking to long time theater critic Peter Filichia, one is reminded of listening to an old-time sportwriter talk about baseball. The Broadway he describes is full of colorful personalities, anecdotes, dates, numbers, and trivia. His spirit is enthusiastic and infectious: he’s turned his love of Broadway into a career. It’s a wonderful counterpoint to the […]

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George HunkaWord Made Flesh: Philosophy, Eros, and Contemporary Tragic Drama

May 1, 2011

George Hunka's book Word Made Flesh: Philosophy, Eros, and Contemporary Tragic Drama (Eyecorner Press, 2011) offers a series of challenges, provocations and meditations on Theatre (with a capital "T"). It’s a valuable piece of work to wrestle with, inviting both consideration and criticism. Much of Word Made Flesh is distilled from his public musings on […]

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Martin DentonPlays and Playwrights 2011

April 20, 2011

The world of "Off-Off Broadway" has been fertile soil for new American plays for decades. Since the late 1990s, one of its most fervent boosters and chroniclers has been Martin Denton, the founder of nytheatre.com and the editor and publisher of the Plays and Playwrights series from NYTE Small Press. The series began in 2000 […]

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Pamela CobrinFrom Winning the Vote to Directing on Broadway: The Emergence of Women on the New York Stage

April 6, 2011

Pamela Cobrin’s book From Winning the Vote to Directing on Broadway: The Emergence of Women on the New York Stage, 1880-1927 (University of Delaware Press, 2009) investigates the suffragists and early feminists through the lens of performance. Broadly defining performance, she includes the amateur theatricals of Mary Shaw’s Gamut Club, the one-acts of the Provincetown […]

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